Examples for Event Description Template

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Lead Sentence Examples

  • By the year 2060, the number of Americans over age 65 is expected to double, to 24 percent of the population, intensifying concerns about end-of-life care.
  • When NBA star Lebron James criticized President Trump on ESPN, Fox News host Laura Ingraham told him to “shut up and dribble.”
  • Planetary scientist Steve Squyres has been roving Mars – virtually – for 14 years, as principle investigator for the Mars Exploration Rovers. Now a smaller, icier body has caught his eye: Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko (comet 67P), from which Squyres wants to bring a sample back to Earth.

Details Examples

  • In a Feb. 23 talk, sociologists Holly Prigerson and Libby Luth will speak on “Psychosocial Influences on End-of-Life Care: Leveraging and Application of Social Constructs,” at 3:30 p.m. in Room 302, Uris Hall.
  • Historian Amy Bass will discuss what happens when professional athletes speak publicly about political issues, in this year’s Harold Seymour Lecture in Sports History, "Listen to Athletes for a Change: Race, Politics, and Sports," March 8 at 4:30 pm in Lewis Auditorium in Goldwin Smith Hall. A book signing will follow the lecture, which is free and open to the public.
  • On July 26, Squyres will explain the exciting science behind the proposed Comet Astrobiology Exploration Sample Return (CAESAR) mission. His talk, at 7 pm in Klarman Hall’s Rhodes-Rawling Auditiorium on the Cornell campus, is free and the public is invited.

“Why” Examples

  • “Holly has made a huge contribution to our understanding of the grief and bereavement surrounding the death of family members and loved ones,” said event host David Strang, professor of sociology.
  • “Amy Bass is a leader of a new generation of public intellectuals, who engage audiences inside and outside of academia,” said Lawrence Glickman, the Stephen and Evalyn Milman Professor in American Studies. “She writes in an accessible way and has not only written academic monographs but popular trade books.“
  • “Comets are the most primitive building blocks of our solar system. Retrieving a sample from the surface of comet 67P can provide unparalleled knowledge about pre-solar history, planet formation, and the steps that led to the origin of life,” said Squyres, the James A. Weeks Professor of Physical Sciences in Cornell’s Department of Astronomy.

Biography/Background Examples

  • Prigerson received her undergraduate degree from Columbia University and has graduate degrees in history and sociology from Stanford University. Her research focuses on psychosocial and behavioral influences on medical care, and care outcomes for patients and families confronting life-threatening illnesses and death. She has studied stages of grief, outcomes of end-of-life communication, and the effects of religious coping on medical decision-making and care near death. Her honors include the 2012 National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s Distinguished End of Life Researcher Award and the 2015 National Cancer Institute R35 Outstanding Investigator Award.
  • Bass is a professor of history at New Rochelle College in New York. Her books include “Not the Triumph, but the Struggle,” the story of the 1968 Olympic protests; and “One Goal: A Coach, a Team, and the Game That Brought a Divided Town Together,” her most recent work, about Somali immigrants, soccer and a Maine community. Her writing has also appeared in Slate, Salon and CNN Opinion. She received an Emmy in 2012 for Outstanding Live Event Turnaround for her work for NBC’s Olympics coverage in London.
  • The CAESAR mission is one of two finalists for NASA’s program of billion-dollar "New Frontiers" missions. If selected, CAESAR will acquire a sample of surface material from the nucleus of comet 67P and return it to Earth for laboratory analysis. At the July 26 talk, Squyres will describe what his team must do to convince NASA to select CAESAR as the next mission in the New Frontiers program.

Full Prewrite/Press Release Examples

Sociologists to explore end-of-life care in Feb. 23 talk

The number of Americans over age 65 is expected to double by 2060, to 24 percent of the population, intensifying concerns about end-of-life care. In a talk on Feb. 23, sociologists Holly Prigerson and Libby Luth will speak on “Psychosocial Influences on End-of-Life Care: Leveraging and Application of Social Constructs,” at 3:30 pm in Rm. 302, Uris Hall. 

In the first part of the talk, Prigerson will highlight the role of patient race and gender in shaping their understanding of illness and their treatment preferences for end-of-life care. In the second part of the talk, Luth will extrapolate sociological insights from Prigerson’s key findings, discussing how a sociological lens can help deepen our understanding of these findings. She will also examine opportunities -- and challenges -- for sociologists to make meaningful contributions to medical research in collaborations with clinicians.

“Holly has made a huge contribution to our understanding of the grief and bereavement surrounding the death of family members and loved ones,” notes David Strang, professor of sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences and event host.

Prigerson is the Irving Sherwood Wright Professor of Geriatrics, Professor of Sociology in Medicine, and director of the Center for Research on End-of-Life Care, at Weill Cornell Medical College. She received her undergraduate degree from Columbia (Barnard) and has graduate degrees in history and sociology from Stanford. Her research focuses on psychosocial and behavioral influences on medical care and care outcomes for patients and families confronting life-threatening illnesses and death. Her studies include those on the stages of grief, outcomes of end-of-life communication, and the effects of religious coping on medical decision-making and care near death. Her studies on Prolonged Grief Disorder, funded by the National Institute of Health, served as the basis for inclusion of this new mental disorder in the forthcoming ICD-11.  Prigerson’s many honors include the 2012 National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s Distinguished End of Life Researcher Award and the 2015 National Cancer Institute R35 Outstanding Investigator Award.

A postdoctoral associate, Luth’s visit to the Ithaca campus is supported through the Trainees Scholarly Exchange Program at Weill Cornell Medicine, which promotes collaborations in cross-campus exchange programs. 

The talk is co-sponsored by the Department of Sociology in the College of Arts and Sciences and Weil Cornell Medical College.

Historian to deliver Seymour Lecture on political activism of athletes

When NBA star Lebron James criticized President Trump on ESPN, Fox News host Laura Ingraham told him to “shut up and dribble.” Historian Amy Bass will discuss what happens when professional athletes speak publicly about political issues, in this year’s Harold Seymour Lecture in Sports History, "Listen to Athletes for a Change: Race, Politics, and Sports," March 8 at 4:30 pm in Lewis Auditorium in Goldwin Smith Hall. A book signing will follow the lecture, which is free and open to the public.

“Amy Bass is a leader of a new generation of public intellectuals, who engage audiences inside and outside of academia,” said Lawrence Glickman, the Stephen and Evalyn Milman Professor in American Studies. “She writes in an accessible way and has not only written academic monographs but popular trade books. “

Bass is a professor of history at New Rochelle College in New York. Her books include “Not the Triumph, but the Struggle,” the story of the 1968 Olympic protests; and “One Goal: A Coach, a Team, and the Game That Brought a Divided Town Together,” her most recent work, about Somali immigrants, soccer and a Maine community. Her writing has also appeared in Slate, Salon and CNN Opinion. She received an Emmy in 2012 for Outstanding Live Event Turnaround for her work for NBC’s Olympics coverage in London. 

The Harold Seymour Lecture in Sports History is presented annually by Cornell University’s Department of History with the support of George Kirsch ’67. It brings distinguished sport historians in the world to Cornell each year.Harold Seymour was one of the first baseball historians in the country, known for his three volume book detailing the development of the sport from an amateur pastime into a professional sport.

Bass will also be appearing at Buffalo Street Books on March 7 at 4:30 pm for a book signing.

Grabbing a piece of the sky: Steve Squyres to speak on proposed NASA mission

Planetary scientist Steve Squyres has been roving Mars – virtually – for 14 years, as principle investigator for the Mars Exploration Rovers. Now a smaller, icier body has caught his eye: Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko (comet 67P), from which Squyres wants to bring a sample back to Earth. On July 26, Squyres will explain the exciting science behind the proposed Comet Astrobiology Exploration Sample Return (CAESAR) mission. His talk, at 7 pm in Klarman Hall’s Rhodes-Rawling Auditiorium on the Cornell campus, is free and the public is invited.

“Comets are the most primitive building blocks of our solar system. Retrieving a sample from the surface of comet 67P can provide unparalleled knowledge about pre-solar history, planet formation, and the steps that led to the origin of life,” said Squyres, the James A. Weeks Professor of Physical Sciences in Cornell’s Department of Astronomy.

The CAESAR mission is one of two finalists for NASA’s program of billion-dollar "New Frontiers" missions. If selected, CAESAR will acquire a sample of surface material from the nucleus of comet 67P and return it to Earth for laboratory analysis. At the July 26 talk, Squyres will describe what his team must do to convince NASA to select CAESAR as the next mission in the New Frontiers program.

The next four months are a critical time for the CAESAR team, according to Squyres, who is principal investigator for the mission; Alex Hayes, assistant professor of astronomy, will serve as payload lead. The CAESAR team has funding until the end of 2018 to refine the hardware, software and mission design. NASA plans to announce in spring 2019 whether CAESAR or the other finalist, Dragonfly, will continue on to the next mission phase. 

The July 26 talk is sponsored by the Department of Astronomy.